Harriet's Revenge

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sorryexcuseforsorry:

THE IMPORTANCE OF EACH OTHER (2014)
pallet-town-julie-brown:

kateordie:

angelica-aswald:

mtvstyle:

want this moment burned on my eyelids

So many girls saw this. Bless.

All hail the queen.

Let this sink in. She declared herself a feminist in front of a bunch of white women who decided they werent feminists like katy perry and then her husband and child, the things feminists evidently don’t have, wete cheering on and gave her an award
nikisgroove:

For my Daughter#LOVE

ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden

Artist Statement
Tamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.

info via ADA

(Source: ourafrica, via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)

myampgoesto11:

More Illustrations by Artist on Tumblr Winnie Truong | Website

(see earlier post)

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

olympic88:

Dominique Duncan of Nigeria

Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games

So dreamy!!!

(via thekrissychula)

devoutfashion:

Photographer: Kasia Bielska

Makeup Artist: Cassi Renee

Model: Alima Fofana

(via thekrissychula)

ivoryathena:

Badass women from history - part 2 (part 1)

  1. Cheering women at a Civil Rights march
  2. Black surfers at the beach
  3. Bessie Stringfield, “The Motorcycle Queen of Miami”—the first black woman to ride across the United States solo
  4. Black Lesbian group banner on the Lesbian Strength march, 1984
  5. Eartha Kitt doing yoga by the ocean

(via thekrissychula)

ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Lucy Hicks Anderson was a pioneer in the fight for marriage equality. She spent nearly sixty years living as a woman, doing domestic work, and working as a madam. During the last decade of her life, she made history by fighting for the legal right to be herself with the man she loved.

After marrying her second husband, soldier Reuben Anderson, in Oxnard, California, in 1944, local authorities discovered that she was assigned male at birth. The couple was charged with perjury for marrying despite their both being legally male, resulting in ten years of probation. Standing up to the charges against her, Anderson said, “I defy any doctor in the world to prove that I am not a woman. I have lived, dressed, acted just what I am, a woman.” Years later, Anderson and her husband were charged again, this time with fraud after she received federal money reserved for military spouses. Both went to prison and were banned from Oxnard upon their release.

Lucy Hicks Anderson spent the remainder of her life in Los Angeles until her death in 1954, at age 68, leaving behind a legacy of authenticity and determination in the face of unjust laws.


5 Black Trans Women who Paved the Way — Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition

(via howtobeterrell)

amare-habeo:

Leonora Carrington  (1917 - 2011) 
Holy Grass (De la hierba santa), 1975
oil and tempera on canvas
via arsvitaest