theladybadass:

Rare footage of educator and civil rights leader, Mary McLeod Bethune (circa 1930s, 1940s)

*found in Prelinger Open Archives

rootsnbluesfestival:

Big Mama Thornton, Muddy Waters, James Cotton, Otis Span and others (1965) by Jim Marshall

rootsnbluesfestival:

Big Mama Thornton, Muddy Waters, James Cotton, Otis Span and others (1965) by Jim Marshall

imgltd:

Discover NY @BOMB Magazine and it’s excellent online content + cover archive [1981—?]

imgltd:

Discover NY @BOMB Magazine and it’s excellent online content + cover archive [1981—?]

art21:

"I don’t think that my work is actually effectively dealing with history. I think of my work as subsumed by history or consumed by history." —Kara Walker

New episode from Art21’s Exclusive series: An in-depth look at the creation of Kara Walker’s monumental public project for Creative Time, A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby (2014), at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, NY.

WATCH: Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

afrodiaspores:

"Tante," a mambo or elder in the Vodou tradition, in the Batey [sugar cane workers’ community] Isabela by Tino Soriano, 2001

In the Dominican Republic, lured by false promises of employment, Haitians end up working in the sugar cane harvest, also called “la zafra,” between December and June. They do it under working conditions that violate all international laws…

afrodiaspores:

"Tante," a mambo or elder in the Vodou tradition, in the Batey [sugar cane workers’ community] Isabela by Tino Soriano, 2001

In the Dominican Republic, lured by false promises of employment, Haitians end up working in the sugar cane harvest, also called “la zafra,” between December and June. They do it under working conditions that violate all international laws…

digitalimprints:

Daddy duties

digitalimprints:

Daddy duties

blackhistoryalbum:

"My recipe for life is not being afraid of myself, afraid of what I think or of my opinions."— Eartha Kit (with husband John William McDonald, 1960s)

blackhistoryalbum:

"My recipe for life is not being afraid of myself, afraid of what I think or of my opinions."

— Eartha Kit (with husband John William McDonald, 1960s)

sorryexcuseforsorry:

THE IMPORTANCE OF EACH OTHER (2014)

sorryexcuseforsorry:

THE IMPORTANCE OF EACH OTHER (2014)

pallet-town-julie-brown:

kateordie:

angelica-aswald:

mtvstyle:

want this moment burned on my eyelids

So many girls saw this. Bless.

All hail the queen.

Let this sink in. She declared herself a feminist in front of a bunch of white women who decided they werent feminists like katy perry and then her husband and child, the things feminists evidently don’t have, wete cheering on and gave her an award

pallet-town-julie-brown:

kateordie:

angelica-aswald:

mtvstyle:

want this moment burned on my eyelids

So many girls saw this. Bless.

All hail the queen.

Let this sink in. She declared herself a feminist in front of a bunch of white women who decided they werent feminists like katy perry and then her husband and child, the things feminists evidently don’t have, wete cheering on and gave her an award

nikisgroove:

For my Daughter#LOVE

nikisgroove:

For my Daughter#LOVE

ourafrica:

Artwork by Jamaican artist Tamara Natalie Madden

Artist Statement
Tamara has always felt a connection to ‘everyday folk’, the working class, the unseen and unheard, the true warriors of our time. She realized, however, that many people who may have suffered through a similar struggle, did not want to revisit those struggles. With great thought and consideration for her message, she decided to amend her ideas. Inspired, by the golden period of Gustav Klimt and images of royalty from Egypt and West Africa; she decided to turn regular folk into representations of nobility. It seemed, in her view, to be the only way to allow them to be represented and appreciated for who they were intrinsically; kings, queens and warriors, in their own right, who never had a chance to shine, their austere appearance setting the tone for others to judge them. The embellishments with rich fabrics and gold present an opportunity for these people to be seen. The quilted clothing have a double meaning, on one hand representing a sense of distinction, while also allowing for a bit of nostalgia. The birds in the pieces represent a sense of freedom. It was her way of injecting her personal experiences into each painting and remembering her escape and survival from illness and the dialysis machine.

info via ADA